What causes Panic Attacks?

“It literally feels like the world is falling apart and whatever went on was catastrophic, even though it would be a really small thing.” This is how the panic attacks will make a person feel like.   Did you know that roughly 10% of the teenagers and about 40% of adults suffer from panic attacks […]

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Types of Behaviour Addiction

Alcohol addiction, drug addiction, substance abuse – are the popular addictions you would have heard of. But did you know that some of the behaviors too that can be addictive? Yes, you read it right. There are many types of behavior addictions such as gambling addiction, shopping addiction, sex addiction, food addiction, internet addiction, fitness […]

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What is a Panic Attack?

A woman named Bella in her mid 30’s was once rushed to the emergency room of a nearby hospital. She was profusely sweating and she felt like her heart was racing at one instance, such that she was unable to take a breath. She and her husband were certain that, she had a heartache. But, […]

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Internet Addiction

Do you play video games on the Internet in overabundance? Are you enthusiastically shopping online? Can’t physically quit checking Facebook? If your answer is yes for any of these questions, you may have the internet addiction.   The world which we live in today is full of advanced technological inventions. Nowadays education, entertainment, communication, and […]

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Is Schizophrenia Genetic?

All of us are aware of how genetics plays an important role in various illnesses. But, have you ever imagined as to what has heredity to do with Schizophrenia? This is one of the common questions many people ask whether schizophrenia is a hereditary disease. The answer is yes and no! Yes, Schizophrenia does have […]

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How to Predict the Drug Usage in your Teen

Even if your teenagers do not use drugs, you still need to keep an eye on them. It is much better to realize that things could change, and anticipate that your teen COULD become a user. Essentially, it is not wise to make assumptions about topics such as drug use. Also, having been a high school teacher afforded me the opportunity to witness peer pressure, and how even good kids could be convinced to try drugs – just to fit in. It is important that you play a proactive role in ensuring that your teenagers and the rest of your family remains drug free.

About drug use

Initially, I learned that the signs of drug use included three basic symptoms:

  • A loss of interest in hobbies
  • A change in friends
  • A drop in grades

What I later discovered was that not seeing these symptoms only provides a false sense of security regarding teenagers and potential drug use. The above behaviors apply more to signs of “drug addiction,” as opposed to “experimental” drug use.

Teens who experiment with drugs don’t start out addicted so logically, they do not show any symptoms. They generally look healthy and nothing seems to be wrong. In fact, teens can casually use drugs for over a year before their parents would even suspect any drug or alcohol use.

Many teenagers who decide to experiment with drugs start out casually, using them with friends and then progressing towards regular use. It is important that you look for clues pertaining to casual drug use so that if your teen is prone, you can proactively deal with it.

What you can do

You need to monitor your teen’s behavior and watch for signs of drug use, without appearing to be spying. Your goal should be to prevent him or her from feeling free to experiment with drugs or alcohol. The best way to accomplish this is to keep abreast of your teen’s activities and friends. You will be able to spot a problem early if you keep your eyes and ears open, and believe that YOUR teenager is capable of using drugs. Many parents get blind-sided by thinking that their teen would never try drugs. Only then will you be ready to intervene if the situation presents itself.

The following are ten ways to monitor your teenager’s behavior and watch for signs of drug use, without appearing to be spying:

1. Hug your teen as soon as s/he arrives home. Check for odors of possible marijuana smoke or alcohol. Remember that cologne or chewing gum may be used to hide the odor.

2. Teenagers under the influence will usually go straight to their room when they arrive home. While making eye contact, hold a brief conversation. Check for bloodshot eyes, slurred speech and their sense of balance.

3. Keep the lights on and stay up until your teenager comes home.

4. Ask your teen for the time and watch the way s/he looks at his or her watch.

5. If your teenager unexpectedly wants to spend the night at a friend’s house, and you have concerns, say no.

6. Maintain a flexible schedule. Be unpredictable so your teen cannot find it easy to plan around your activities.

7. Keep abreast of what your teen is really doing when away from home. Meet their friends and their parents and participate in mutual activities. This is a very effective form of networking.

8. Ask your neighbors to discretely keep an eye on any activities that may take place while you are not home.

9. Check to see how your teens are doing in school. Ask their teachers if there is any cause for concern or if your teen has been behaving differently.

10. After you meet your teenager’s friends, always ask them to identify themselves when they call. Get to know them. Always encourage your teens to invite their friends over while you are home.

Remember, your goal should be to prevent your teenager from feeling free to experiment with drugs or alcohol. The best way to accomplish this is to keep abreast of their activities and friends using the above methods.

Lastly, but most important, talk to your teenager on a regular basis about the drug use she witnesses, and how she feels about it. Also, if she has been approached, have her describe how she handled the situation. Strive for honesty and ask how you can help her to remain drug free.

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