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Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and addiction can go hand to hand. The question that arises here is whether the hen came first or the egg? The same applied with BPD and with substance abuse.  they are not guaranteed co-occurring illness, talk about how many ppl with addiction have chances of this. What is Borderline Personality […]

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Living With Dementia Parent As...

Hello, I am Kamal Jeet Singh, I am a caregiver for my dad who’s suffering from dementia since 2016. Recently, I read a piece of news and got to know that 40-60% of dementia caregivers experience significant stress. Such an immense number kept me worried. According to my layman knowledge, at least 50% of them […]

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All you need to know about Fac...

Too much of anything is dangerous, and so is the same with Facebook. Yes, Facebook has become so popular that psychologists identified a new mental health disorder called “Facebook Addiction Disorder”. Yes, you heard it right!   “Facebook addiction according to psychologists, is a fine line between social networking and social dysfunction.” Infact – Facebook […]

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Is Parkinson’s a form of...

Yes, Parkinson’s disease is a type of Dementia. It is a progressive disorder that affects changes in the body movement. The average age of onset of Parkinson’s disease is 60 years and the longer somebody has it, the more likely they are to develop dementia. What causes the illness? What are the symptoms, risk factors […]

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Dementia Caregiver Stress

Frankly, caregiving is not an easy task to do. The role of a caregiver demands more patience, better understanding, self-discipline, above all a scads of responsibilities. If you are into this role, firstly, pat yourself on your back, you are doing a fabulous job! A recent study published by the National Academy of Science suggests […]

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Long Term Care for Dementia

Long Term Care for Dementia

If you have a loved one with dementia and you’re caring for them, it’s important for you to understand options for long term care for dementia. Remember that you also need to carefully evaluate the quality and service of care. Here’s help for you on how and what to know about long term dementia care.

Long Term Care for Dementia

Long term care for dementia means providing full-time support and care based on the individual needs.

Long term Dementia Care Options for Elderly

Long Term Care for Dementia

Long-term care provides different levels of care, help with daily living, support, and programs. The costs and quality of care and services vary widely.  Here are the types of long term care for dementia.

  • Assisted-living: If your loved one with dementia needs support with daily activities and personal care. assisted-living will be helpful. These services may include cleaning, meals, and laundry services, and help with personal needs such as grooming, and dressing.  
  • Residential care: This includes retirement homes usually provides a greater level of supervision. These centres offer community-style housing, laundry, meals and cleaning services, and along with help with personal needs.  
  • Skilled nursing facilities: They provide nursing care up to 24 hours a day. They offer medical care; medicines; meals; housing;  laundry; help with dressing, bathing and other support.
  • Specialized dementia care: These include memory care and mainly focus on the needs of people with dementia. Special care units have well-trained staff to assist people with dementia. The specialized structure, meaningful activities are provided based on the individual’s strengths and preferences.
  • Continuing-care: These offers assisted living with complete nursing care. These may be a good choice for the people with dementia because they can meet the individuals changing needs.

When to decide to move to a long term care for Dementia for Loved one?

Here are the signs you should look for to recognize when its the time Long Term Care for dementia for a loved one:

  1. Physical Decline: Look for signs such as significant weight loss, balancing issues and loss of stamina and strength, and other declines in the daily activities such as the ability to shower, dress, or eat independently.
  2. Mental Deterioration: Loss of memory, confusing names, locations and dates. Cognitive decline is a major warning sign that you should be on the lookout for dementia. This condition can worsen quickly and also can lead to many safety issues and physical breakdowns.
  3. Lifestyle changes:  Is the house not being kept as organised as in the past?  or are the things out of place (a dwelling plant in the fridge, pans and pots in the bathtub), or any signs of physical damage. Remember, Long Term Care is both matter of healthcare and safety.

The care a person with dementia needs will increase as the illness gets worse. Even the basic activities such as eating,  bathing, dressing, and simply moving around become impossible or harder without help. Also, safety will be a concern.Long Term Care for Dementia

Seeking external help can ease the emotional and physical burdens of caregiving – and the earlier you consider long term care options, the better it will be to evaluate your loved one’s care and needs. Learn more about dementia.

Need more information about long term care for Dementia?

If you need any assistance or more information about long term care for dementia, we are available and happy to assist, you are not alone. e-mail us your queries at info@cadabams.org. Or visit us at Cadabam’s. Alternatively, you can also call us on our 24/7 helpline number- +91 96111 94949.

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