Why do you need Mental Health ...

Every day we learn of suicide and individuals engaging in mass murder. Most of these individuals actually suffer from mental illness. From the youngest to the oldest all are at risk when it comes to mental illness. So what do we do in times like this? We provide Mental Health First Aid. Mental Health First […]

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When does Psychological First ...

  The world is going through a crisis. From disasters, wars, terrorist attacks, traumatic events, ongoing discrimination towards sections of society, criminal activities etc. causes a large number of victims and affected family members of such victims undergo a major psychological breakdown. At times like this Psychological First Aid helps to prevent their health from […]

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Mental Health First Aid

In a first aid an injured person is given essential help until a professional medical treatment is given. The main aim of a first aid is to save life, prevent any kind of further harm, promote recovery and provide comfort. Mental health first aid (MHFA) does the same for individual developing mental health problems. Mental […]

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What are the other medical pro...

Dementia refers to a loss of mental function which compromises a person’s cognitive thinking. It results in declining memory and linguistic skill as well as behavioural changes. It is a progressive disease caused by brain damage. This means that the symptoms and effects will progressively worsen over time. The effects can range from physical or […]

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Say No to Cocaine in all forms...

We live in a world where taking cocaine is trendier than fashion. Its availability and use is not limited to a certain class of the society or an age group. The ‘Happening’ drug is easily available at the hidden corner of the street nearby. Whether it is to boost self-esteem or just succumbing to peer-pressure, […]

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Mental illness: Need to treat patients with care and dignity

Sometimes it, simply, defies logic: How on earth can someone’s disease become his or her stigma. Mention diseases like Typhoid, malaria, fever, cold and cough, cancer, TB, etc. and no one would bat an eyelid, let alone look at you. Talk to someone in public about mental illness, and you have glanck2es following you everywhere. The social stigma attached to mental illness is one of the most difficult hurdles on the path to its mitigation.

Treat with dignity

No wonder, as the World Health Organisation (WHO) observes the World Mental Health Day on October 10, it clearly seeks to underline the word ‘dignity’. Quite appropriately, thus, this year’s theme of the World Mental Health Day is: ‘Dignity in Mental Health’. It implies that like all other illnesses, people suffering from mental illness need to be treated well and with dignity and his or her human rights are protected.

At the back burner

Strangely enough, mental health issues across the world for long did not occupy the attention of authorities. Any mention of mental illness immediately brings to people’s mind the image of a mental asylum with patients being forcibly tied to a hook by an iron chain and patients making ugly and strange noises from behind the bars.

Filmy perception!

The seemingly filmy perceptions about mental illness have also bred numerous misconceptions about the disease and its treatment. This has lent the issue of mental illness a social stigma. Result: today a large number of cases of mental illnesses go unreported as people with the illness are reluctant to come out in the open and acknowledge that they are mentally ill.

Human rights denied

The WHO’s stress on dignity while addressing mental health issues therefore serves an important purpose by encouraging people to take mental illness and people suffering from it more seriously. Unfortunately, due to the stigma attached to the mental illness, people with such conditions are being denied their basic human rights across the globe.

Mental, physical abuse

There have been umpteen reports of mentally ill persons being maltreated, discriminated against, stigmatised and marginalised. Such patients also often have to face physical and mental abuse at health facilities and at the hands of the community they live with. In the absence of qualified mental health experts and doctors their suffering increases manifold.

Awareness campaign

This year, WHO launches an awareness campaign to ensure that people with mental health conditions can continue to live with dignity, through human rights oriented policy and law, training of health professionals, respect for informed consent to treatment, inclusion in decision-making processes, and public information campaigns.