How to help an Alcoholic?

It is painful and overwhelming to see someone you love destroy their life due to an addictive behaviour. Alcoholics usually tend to deny their addiction and only realize it when its negative effects have spread into almost all areas of life. Here the role of friends and family members can be effective in encouraging them […]

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First aid for Panic Attacks

Panic attack is a condition which is episodic in nature marked by high anxiety and fear, also discomfort that develops suddenly and reaches heights within 10 minutes.   Observable symptoms: Trembling and shaking Sweating Short breaths and sensations of choking If the person reports – palpitations, chest pain or discomfort, abdominal distress or nausea, dizziness […]

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Panic Attack in Child

Did you know that a panic attack in children often manifests in the early stages of adolescence? And, it is the most common psychological problem in the western countries, usually affecting about 2-3% of the people especially the younger ones in a year. There is no specific event triggering the first panic attack in children, […]

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Alcohol Detoxification

Do you know that Delirium tremens kills one in  20 people during alcohol withdrawal? Yes, It is estimated these tremors occur in 5 percent of the people who go through the process of alcohol withdrawal. This is the time where the alcohol detoxification comes into the picture.   It is good if you have decided […]

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How To Stop Panic Attack

Dying on EMI basis?   In the spur of a moment suddenly thinking of losing control, having a heart attack or even dying. No clue of what’s happening in and around? That could be a panic attack. Yes! A panic attack is a sudden impact of intense fear that creates severe physical reactions in the […]

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Mental illness: Need to treat patients with care and dignity

Sometimes it, simply, defies logic: How on earth can someone’s disease become his or her stigma. Mention diseases like Typhoid, malaria, fever, cold and cough, cancer, TB, etc. and no one would bat an eyelid, let alone look at you. Talk to someone in public about mental illness, and you have glancmental illnesses carees following you everywhere. The social stigma attached to mental illness is one of the most difficult hurdles on the path to its mitigation.

Treat with dignity

No wonder, as the World Health Organisation (WHO) observes the World Mental Health Day on October 10, it clearly seeks to underline the word ‘dignity’. Quite appropriately, thus, this year’s theme of the World Mental Health Day is: ‘Dignity in Mental Health’. It implies that like all other illnesses, people suffering from mental illness need to be treated well and with dignity and his or her human rights are protected.

At the back burner

Strangely enough, mental health issues across the world for long did not occupy the attention of authorities. Any mention of mental illness immediately brings to people’s mind the image of a mental asylum with patients being forcibly tied to a hook by an iron chain and patients making ugly and strange noises from behind the bars.

Filmy perception!

The seemingly filmy perceptions about mental illness have also bred numerous misconceptions about the disease and its treatment. This has lent the issue of mental illness a social stigma. Result: today a large number of cases of mental illnesses go unreported as people with the illness are reluctant to come out in the open and acknowledge that they are mentally ill.

Human rights denied

The WHO’s stress on dignity while addressing mental health issues therefore serves an important purpose by encouraging people to take mental illness and people suffering from it more seriously. Unfortunately, due to the stigma attached to the mental illness, people with such conditions are being denied their basic human rights across the globe.

Mental, physical abuse

There have been umpteen reports of mentally ill persons being maltreated, discriminated against, stigmatised and marginalised. Such patients also often have to face physical and mental abuse at health facilities and at the hands of the community they live with. In the absence of qualified mental health experts and doctors their suffering increases manifold.

Awareness campaign

This year, WHO launches an awareness campaign to ensure that people with mental health conditions can continue to live with dignity, through human rights oriented policy and law, training of health professionals, respect for informed consent to treatment, inclusion in decision-making processes, and public information campaigns.

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