What are addiction treatment p...

We at Cadabams provide a wide range of services when it comes to addiction related mental health problems. Addiction is a serious mental condition that is complex and often chronic in nature. It affects the functioning and the constitution of the brain and body. Addiction has serious repercussions on relationships, families, schools, work life and […]

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Is Manic Depression Genetic/ H...

Research and studies indicate that bipolar disorder also known as manic depression share a genetic component. The disorder has a higher risk of being diagnosed in an individual if the disorder is/was prevalent in the individual’s family members. However, the mental illness is mainly triggered and shows an onset post a stressful life event. The […]

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Drug Abuse Rehabilitation

Drug abuse causes drug addiction; it is a chronic disease characterized by compulsive need to seek drug irrespective of its harmful effects. It causes lasting changes in the brain. In order to recover and undo effects of drug the individual and his family members must undertake rehabilitative measures. Rehabilitation helps encourage the addicted individual to: […]

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Manic Depressive Disorder

We all experience our share of ups and downs but with manic depression one experiences these highs and lows quite intensely, affecting one’s job and school performance, personal relationships, and altogether disrupting one’s daily living. Bipolar disorder was formerly known as manic depressive disorder. It is serious mood disorder marked by abnormal levels of mania […]

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Manic Depression Symptoms

We all have our bad day where everything seems to get on our nerves and good days where even the devil cannot stop you. But when do these mood states become a disorder? Like manic depression, also known as bipolar, most of the mental disorders can be confusing and difficult to identify as their symptoms […]

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Tricyclic Antidepression Drugs May Harm Health More Than Treating Depression

Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline, desipramine, and doxepin, may harm your heart, according to a new study conducted by researchers at University College London (UCL). This risk may extend beyond individuals who are being treated for depression, as these older antidepressants are also used to treat anxiety, sleep problems, headache, and back pain, among other conditions.
Although tricyclic antidepressants are one of the oldest classes of antidepressants, they are still used extensively, according to eMedExpert. Today, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have replaced tricyclics as the treatment of choice for depressive disorders, primarily because patients tolerate them better and they are safer if taken in excess.
Researchers at University College London compared the use of tricyclic antidepressants with SSRIs or no antidepressant use in nearly 15,000 individuals in Scotland. Overall, the older antidepressants were linked with a 35 percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease, while use of SSRIs was not.
Based on these findings, Dr. Mark Hamer, senior research fellow in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at UCL remarked that they “suggest that there is an association between the use of tricyclic antidepressants and an increased risk of CVD that is not explained by existing mental illness.” The study results thus indicate that tricyclics have properties that are responsible for the greater risk.
Previous research has shown tricyclic use to be associated with a significantly higher rate of serious cardiovascular side effects, such as increased heart rate, as well as arrhythmias, blood pressure abnormalities, and congestive heart failure. They have also been linked with weight gain and diabetes, which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
The UCL study’s authors note that other factors may be involved in the possible link between tricyclic antidepressant use and cardiovascular disease. Hamer pointed out that individuals who take antidepressants are more likely to be overweight, smoke, and not get sufficient exercise, also risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
Before it can be determined with more certainty that tricyclic antidepressants can harm the heart, “there needs to be more research looking closely at the effects of these drugs on your heart,” notes Amy Thompson, senior cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation. Because antidepressants help a great many people, “it would be unwise for anyone taking them to stop based on the results of this study alone.”

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