Cognitive Behavioral Therapy f...

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for depression. Unlike any other psychotherapy CBT is short term (time limited) and treatment focused. Problem behaviors and thinking are identified, prioritized, and are addressed.   People with depression commonly have a strong negative belief about:   Self: People who are experiencing depression generally has an unfavorable […]

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Drug Addiction Rehabilitation ...

Drug addiction is one of the hard life sufferings for the drug addicts and also for the ones around them. No doubt, it is a tough situation to see your loved one abusing drugs badly and at times you may feel helpless too. But it is never impossible to help them get out of it. […]

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Effects of Drug Addiction

A number of reasons spike when you question as to why people get addicted to the Drugs. Some of them simply use it to see what it feels like while others take it to come out of their depression and stress problems. No matter what is the reason, the use of drugs can eventually lead […]

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Bipolar Disorder in Children

Is your child suddenly bursting with energy and active than other kids their age? Does your child suddenly feel depressed and have no interest in anything at all? Do other people say your child is too excited or too moody? Does he or she talk really fast about a lot of different things or talk nothing […]

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My Drug Addiction Stories

Am Mohan (name changed), I have been a cannabis user for the past 10 years. This is my story on how I got my life back to the normal track, what made me become an addict and what helped me recover. Am going to share my experience with all the readers. Want to see my […]

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Tricyclic Antidepression Drugs May Harm Health More Than Treating Depression

Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline, desipramine, and doxepin, may harm your heart, according to a new study conducted by researchers at University College London (UCL). This risk may extend beyond individuals who are being treated for depression, as these older antidepressants are also used to treat anxiety, sleep problems, headache, and back pain, among other conditions.
Although tricyclic antidepressants are one of the oldest classes of antidepressants, they are still used extensively, according to eMedExpert. Today, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have replaced tricyclics as the treatment of choice for depressive disorders, primarily because patients tolerate them better and they are safer if taken in excess.
Researchers at University College London compared the use of tricyclic antidepressants with SSRIs or no antidepressant use in nearly 15,000 individuals in Scotland. Overall, the older antidepressants were linked with a 35 percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease, while use of SSRIs was not.
Based on these findings, Dr. Mark Hamer, senior research fellow in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at UCL remarked that they “suggest that there is an association between the use of tricyclic antidepressants and an increased risk of CVD that is not explained by existing mental illness.” The study results thus indicate that tricyclics have properties that are responsible for the greater risk.
Previous research has shown tricyclic use to be associated with a significantly higher rate of serious cardiovascular side effects, such as increased heart rate, as well as arrhythmias, blood pressure abnormalities, and congestive heart failure. They have also been linked with weight gain and diabetes, which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
The UCL study’s authors note that other factors may be involved in the possible link between tricyclic antidepressant use and cardiovascular disease. Hamer pointed out that individuals who take antidepressants are more likely to be overweight, smoke, and not get sufficient exercise, also risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
Before it can be determined with more certainty that tricyclic antidepressants can harm the heart, “there needs to be more research looking closely at the effects of these drugs on your heart,” notes Amy Thompson, senior cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation. Because antidepressants help a great many people, “it would be unwise for anyone taking them to stop based on the results of this study alone.”

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