Borderline Personality Disorde...

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious mental health issue manifest by continuous unsteadiness in moods, behaviour, functioning and self-image. These experiences frequently result in unstable relationships and impulsive action. An individual with BPD may meet extreme scenes of anger, misery, and uneasiness that may last from just a couple of hours to days. Borderline […]

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Substance Abuse Statistics

Substance abuse means to the harmful or unsafe use of psychoactive substances, including illicit drugs and alcohol. Psychoactive substance use can prompt to dependence disorder; a group of behavioural, physiological, cognitive phenomenon that create after frequent substance use and that normally incorporate a powerful urge to take the drug, challenges in controlling its use, holding […]

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Borderline Personality Disorde...

Borderline personality disorder or BPD is mostly known to occur among women and rarely seen in men. It is a disorder that characterizes high emotionality, sensitivity and unstable patterns of relationships. Men express BPD symptoms differently from women, this is one of the reasons it gets misunderstood. It has been suggested by studies that women […]

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Substance Abuse Disorder

Substance abuse disorder is when an individual engages in a harmful intake of a substance or drug, affecting various areas of life. Due to the substance abuse the individual fails to function effectively in their personal, professional and social areas of life. Identifying the symptoms at an early stage can enable a quicker recovery. Here […]

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Borderline Personality Disorde...

Do you have someone in your life who, most of the time, have terrible mood fluctuations, multiple unstable relationships, always feel empty and impulsive? Are these affecting their personal and professional life? You may consider seeking a professional opinion as these are primary symptoms of borderline personality disorder or BPD. Here are few questions that […]

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Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treament Services,Rehab Centers

Everyone entering treatment receives a clinical assessment. A complete assessment of an individual is needed to help treatment professionals offer the type of treatment that best suits him or her. The assessment also helps program counselors work with the person to design an effective treatment plan.Although clinical assessment continues throughout a person’s treatment, it starts at or just before a person’s admission to a treatment program. The counselor will begin by gathering information about the person, asking many questions such as those about

1. Kinds, amount, and length of time of substance or alcohol use
2. Cultural issues around useof alcohol or drugs
3. Effects of drug or alcohol use on the person’s life
4. Medical history
5. Current medical problems or needs
6. Current medications (including pain medication)
7. Mental health issues or behavioral problems
8. Family and social issues and needs
9. Legal or financial problems
10.Educational background and needs
11.Current living situation and environment
12.Employment history, stability, problems, and needs
13.School performance, problems and needs, if relevant
14.Previous treatment experiences or attempts to quit drug or alcohol use.

The counselor may invite you, as a family member, to answer questions and express your own concerns as well. Be honest—this is not the time to cover up your loved one’s behavior. The counselor needs to get a full picture of the problem to plan and help implement the most effective treatment. It is particularly important for the counselor to know whether your family member has any serious medical problems or whether you suspect that he or she may have an emotional problem. You may feel embarrassed answering some of these questions or have difficulty completing the interview, but remember: the counselor is there to help you and your loved one.
The treatment team uses the information gathered to recommend the best type of treatment. No one type of treatment is right for everyone; to work, the treatment needs to meet your family member’s individual needs.
After the assessment, a counselor or case manager is assigned to your family member. The counselor works with the person (and possibly his or her family) to develop a treatment plan. This plan lists problems, treatment goals, and ways to meet those goals. Based on the assessment, the counselor may refer your family member to a physician to decide whether he or she needs Detoxification Or medical supervision to stop alcohol or drug use safely. Medically supervised withdrawal (often called detoxification or detox) uses medication to help people withdraw from alcohol or drugs.

People who have been taking large amounts of opioids (e.g., heroin, OxyContin7, or codeine), barbiturates or sedatives (“downers”), pain medications, or alcohol— either alone or together—may need medically monitored or managed withdrawal services. Sometimes, alcohol withdrawal can be so severe that people hallucinate, have convulsions, or develop other dangerous conditions. Medication can help prevent or treat such conditions. Anyone who has once had hallucinations orseizures from alcohol withdrawalor who has another serious illness or (in some cases) a mental disorder that could complicate detoxification may need medical supervision to detoxify safely. Medically supervised withdrawal can take place on a regular medical ward of a hospital, in a specialized inpatient detoxification unit, or on an outpatient basis with close medical supervision. Detoxification may take several days to a week or more. During that time, the person will receive medical care and may begin to receive education about his or her disease.

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