How to help an Alcoholic?

It is painful and overwhelming to see someone you love destroy their life due to an addictive behaviour. Alcoholics usually tend to deny their addiction and only realize it when its negative effects have spread into almost all areas of life. Here the role of friends and family members can be effective in encouraging them […]

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First aid for Panic Attacks

Panic attack is a condition which is episodic in nature marked by high anxiety and fear, also discomfort that develops suddenly and reaches heights within 10 minutes.   Observable symptoms: Trembling and shaking Sweating Short breaths and sensations of choking If the person reports – palpitations, chest pain or discomfort, abdominal distress or nausea, dizziness […]

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Panic Attack in Child

Did you know that a panic attack in children often manifests in the early stages of adolescence? And, it is the most common psychological problem in the western countries, usually affecting about 2-3% of the people especially the younger ones in a year. There is no specific event triggering the first panic attack in children, […]

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Alcohol Detoxification

Do you know that Delirium tremens kills one in  20 people during alcohol withdrawal? Yes, It is estimated these tremors occur in 5 percent of the people who go through the process of alcohol withdrawal. This is the time where the alcohol detoxification comes into the picture.   It is good if you have decided […]

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How To Stop Panic Attack

Dying on EMI basis?   In the spur of a moment suddenly thinking of losing control, having a heart attack or even dying. No clue of what’s happening in and around? That could be a panic attack. Yes! A panic attack is a sudden impact of intense fear that creates severe physical reactions in the […]

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Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treament Services,Rehab Centers

Everyone entering treatment receives a clinical assessment. A complete assessment of an individual is needed to help treatment professionals offer the type of treatment that best suits him or her. The assessment also helps program counselors work with the person to design an effective treatment plan.Although clinical assessment continues throughout a person’s treatment, it starts at or just before a person’s admission to a treatment program. The counselor will begin by gathering information about the person, asking many questions such as those about

1. Kinds, amount, and length of time of substance or alcohol use
2. Cultural issues around useof alcohol or drugs
3. Effects of drug or alcohol use on the person’s life
4. Medical history
5. Current medical problems or needs
6. Current medications (including pain medication)
7. Mental health issues or behavioral problems
8. Family and social issues and needs
9. Legal or financial problems
10.Educational background and needs
11.Current living situation and environment
12.Employment history, stability, problems, and needs
13.School performance, problems and needs, if relevant
14.Previous treatment experiences or attempts to quit drug or alcohol use.

The counselor may invite you, as a family member, to answer questions and express your own concerns as well. Be honest—this is not the time to cover up your loved one’s behavior. The counselor needs to get a full picture of the problem to plan and help implement the most effective treatment. It is particularly important for the counselor to know whether your family member has any serious medical problems or whether you suspect that he or she may have an emotional problem. You may feel embarrassed answering some of these questions or have difficulty completing the interview, but remember: the counselor is there to help you and your loved one.
The treatment team uses the information gathered to recommend the best type of treatment. No one type of treatment is right for everyone; to work, the treatment needs to meet your family member’s individual needs.
After the assessment, a counselor or case manager is assigned to your family member. The counselor works with the person (and possibly his or her family) to develop a treatment plan. This plan lists problems, treatment goals, and ways to meet those goals. Based on the assessment, the counselor may refer your family member to a physician to decide whether he or she needs Detoxification Or medical supervision to stop alcohol or drug use safely. Medically supervised withdrawal (often called detoxification or detox) uses medication to help people withdraw from alcohol or drugs.

People who have been taking large amounts of opioids (e.g., heroin, OxyContin7, or codeine), barbiturates or sedatives (“downers”), pain medications, or alcohol— either alone or together—may need medically monitored or managed withdrawal services. Sometimes, alcohol withdrawal can be so severe that people hallucinate, have convulsions, or develop other dangerous conditions. Medication can help prevent or treat such conditions. Anyone who has once had hallucinations orseizures from alcohol withdrawalor who has another serious illness or (in some cases) a mental disorder that could complicate detoxification may need medical supervision to detoxify safely. Medically supervised withdrawal can take place on a regular medical ward of a hospital, in a specialized inpatient detoxification unit, or on an outpatient basis with close medical supervision. Detoxification may take several days to a week or more. During that time, the person will receive medical care and may begin to receive education about his or her disease.

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